Ports of Call

Luxury destinations

Explore our ports of call, where you can walk, shop, and dine in Caribbean paradises!

Ft. Lauderdale, FL

There is an abundance of things to see and do in the Fort Lauderdale area: visit the newly redesigned Fort Lauderdale Beach and cafes, stroll the historic Riverwalk, shop the luxurious stores on Las Olas Boulevard or venture to the Everglades for an intriguing air boat excursion.


Phillipsburg, St. Maarten

This Leeward island has been famously bisected into French and Dutch territories since 1648, and is referred to both as Saint Martin and Sint Maarten. In their respective capitals—Marigot and Philipsburg—there are ancient stone forts and candy-colored buildings lining winding streets. The Dutch side has a slightly larger population but is a bit smaller, at 34 square kilometers (13 square miles), versus the 53-square-kilometer (20-square-mile) Saint Martin. Named for its founder John Philips, Philipsburg, the capital of the Dutch side, has some excellent international art galleries, thumping discos and popular casinos. Farther afield are beautiful beaches and a seemingly endless array of nature conservancies. With them come extensive opportunities for adventure—hiking, biking and zip lining—and amazing wildlife sightings in the sea, on land and in the sky. On the French side, there are cafés serving café au lait and pain au chocolat and sidewalk bistros offering chilled rosé and savory crepes. A variety of luxury shops and cosmopolitan boutiques beckon to sophisticated shoppers who love a good bargain—the entire island has no sales tax.


Frederiksted, St. Croix

It's one of the three isles that make up the U.S. Virgin Islands, and though St. Croix is the largest—measuring 218 square kilometers (84 square miles)—it's the least visited of the trio. Perhaps that's because much of the island has been set aside as parkland, which means fewer tourist hubs and more space dedicated to natural wonders, including pristine beaches and primo snorkeling and diving. But St. Croix also boasts many excellent historical sites. At various times it was controlled by Spain, Britain, France, the Netherlands and Denmark; the latter's influence is the most visible in the architecture of St. Croix's charming capital city of Christiansted, on the northern coast. Frederiksted, on the western point of the island, is a busy port surrounded by some significant colonial attractions, with a restored sugar estate and an 18th-century fort being among the most noteworthy. Here you'll also find a family-run rum distillery and many restaurants and shops.

 


Half Moon Cay, Bahamas

Also known as Little San Salvador Island, Half Moon Cay is located 16 kilometers (10 miles) southeast of Nassau. In 1996, Holland America Line purchased the island and decided to set aside most of it as a protected wildlife sanctuary—only two percent of the island has been developed. This is especially appreciated by photographers and bird-watching enthusiasts as they explore the preserve and its variety of species. At 10 square kilometers (four square miles), the island is small enough that you can see it all in a day, yet large enough to offer a range of activities: horseback riding, snorkeling with stingrays, a range of water sports and, of course, simply lounging on the beach while taking occasional dips in the clear sea to cool off. At the island’s Straw Market, you can shop for crafts made in the Bahamas, while the waterfront bars and Tropics Restaurant are ready to serve you a meal or drink when you've finished surveying your private paradise.